kenobi-wan-obi:


jtotheizzoe:

crookedindifference:

17 Equations That Changed The World

I would argue that they merely described the world, rather than changed it, but still cool.

I would argue that the very act of describing the world in the way mathematics did, subsequently changed the world. It’s not like mathematicians did math locked away in room forever, all these equations had real world consequences. To say equations are just descriptions or some how insinuate they haven’t changed the world is oversimplifying things. The title is pretty fitting.

kenobi-wan-obi:

jtotheizzoe:

crookedindifference:

17 Equations That Changed The World

I would argue that they merely described the world, rather than changed it, but still cool.

I would argue that the very act of describing the world in the way mathematics did, subsequently changed the world. It’s not like mathematicians did math locked away in room forever, all these equations had real world consequences. To say equations are just descriptions or some how insinuate they haven’t changed the world is oversimplifying things. The title is pretty fitting.

(via scinerds)

stargazerland:

parkbenchpoet4:

poisoned-ivie:

kalories:

thebrokentaboos:

Ad Campaign by Amnesty International Switzerland

Switzerland are always forward thinkers.

this is one of the most humbling ad campaigns i’ve seen.

This is amazing

Commercial art done correctly.

(Source: idealistsconundrum, via mrtimh)

awkwardsituationist:

from girl rising …to consider on international women’s day (and every day thereafter)

(via 1001arabianights)

scinerds:

prepaidafrica:

Today, on International Woman’s Day, we’re very proud to be able to bring you a woman’s story of engineering, technology, innovation and invention solving an everyday problem.

In Kinshasa, capital of the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo, traffic congestion is a serious problem. Apparently, few drivers bother to obey signs, lights, or even human traffic directors. It was a snarled free-for-all. Until the robots showed up.

The Congolese engineer Isaie Therese designed and built two 8-foot-tall, classic Robbie the Robot-style automatons to take over traffic-directing duties from their human forebears, and apparently, the plan is working.

“As a motorcyclist I’m very happy with the robot’s work,” one commuter told CCTV Africa. ”Because when the traffic police control the cars here there’s still a lot of traffic. But since the robot arrived, we see truly that the commuters are respectful.”

click through for a video report on her achievement

Putting this up again for the evening crowd incase they missed it!

#afrofuturismisnow

“Oh we’re a mess, poor humans, poor flesh—hybrids of angels and animals, dolls with diamonds stuffed inside them. We’ve been to the moon and we’re still fighting over Jerusalem. Let me tell you what I do know: I am more than one thing, and not all of those things are good. The truth is complicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet. I used to think that if I dug deep enough to discover something sad and ugly, I’d know it was something true. Now I’m trying to dig deeper.

I didn’t want to write these pages until there were no hard feelings, no sharp ones. I do not have that luxury. I am sad and angry and I want everyone to be alive again. I want more landmarks, less landmines. I want to be grateful but I’m having a hard time with it.”

Richard Siken, Spork Editor’s Pages: Black Telephone (via yakovbarnes)

(Source: gammabombs, via lifeinpoetry)

(1) President Abraham Lincoln, who had depression
(2) Writer Virginia Woolf, who had bipolar disorder
(3) Artist Vincent Van Gogh, who had bipolar disorder
(4) Writer Sylvia Plath, who had depression
(5) Mathematician John Nash (from A Brilliant Mind), who had schizophrenia

Inspired by this post

(Source: madvocate, via ilovecharts)

ohitsjustkim:

thesonicscrew:

themunchkym:

tylerfucklin:

burningbra:

spoilersweetie:

eveninmywandering:

prochoicetruth:

What happens to your organs during pregnancy… Yes, stomach capacity shrinks, yes lung capacity shrinks. Organs get smushed and sometimes permanently displaced. Sometimes hernias will appear or worsen. Sometimes the pelvic floor permanently drops. Sometimes internal damage occurs that you don’t find out about until you’re 50 and going in for your first colonoscopy. Sometimes you need an episiotomy.
Pregnancy is not a walk in the park. Why should you force people into it?

This has legitimately put me off having children

…am i the only one who thought this was AMAZING?

yes

okay yeah, my mom is 49 and she’s had reconstructive bladder surgery because my brothers and I were such big babies, and we were natural born, that now that she’s going through menopause, her body is falling apart. her appendix is fucked up and they might have to remove part of her colon. all because of damage she got from having children that just got worse over time.
none of us were c-sections. My big bro was 8lbs5oz, I was 7lbs 8oz, My little bro was 11 lbs, 9 oz.
I’m amazed anyone under the age of 20 can safely have babies without suffering bodily harm.

Good god, pregnancy is terrifying.

I’ve never been more appreciative of my penis.
Poor people with vaginas…

eeewwww

ohitsjustkim:

thesonicscrew:

themunchkym:

tylerfucklin:

burningbra:

spoilersweetie:

eveninmywandering:

prochoicetruth:

What happens to your organs during pregnancy… Yes, stomach capacity shrinks, yes lung capacity shrinks. Organs get smushed and sometimes permanently displaced. Sometimes hernias will appear or worsen. Sometimes the pelvic floor permanently drops. Sometimes internal damage occurs that you don’t find out about until you’re 50 and going in for your first colonoscopy. Sometimes you need an episiotomy.

Pregnancy is not a walk in the park. Why should you force people into it?

This has legitimately put me off having children

…am i the only one who thought this was AMAZING?

yes

okay yeah, my mom is 49 and she’s had reconstructive bladder surgery because my brothers and I were such big babies, and we were natural born, that now that she’s going through menopause, her body is falling apart. her appendix is fucked up and they might have to remove part of her colon. all because of damage she got from having children that just got worse over time.

none of us were c-sections. My big bro was 8lbs5oz, I was 7lbs 8oz, My little bro was 11 lbs, 9 oz.

I’m amazed anyone under the age of 20 can safely have babies without suffering bodily harm.

Good god, pregnancy is terrifying.

I’ve never been more appreciative of my penis.

Poor people with vaginas…

eeewwww

(Source: choosechoice)

myampgoesto11:

Kinetic light sculptures by artist/physicist Paul Friedlander

(via freshphotons)

ianbrooks:

Strange Attractors by Chaotic Atmospheres

The darkest art known as Chaos Theory is perfectly embodied in the form of its strange attractors: vast looping trajectories of variables that, when plotted, conjure gorgeous yet insidiously disruptive patterns. Chaotic Atmosphere’s Math: Rules series pays tribute to the beautiful form of chaos and its inevitable collapse of all our efforts to predict it.

Artist: Behance / DeviantArt / Twitter

(via freshphotons)

natureoflight:

Bio-light…light fixture that runs on bacteria.

(via ladylou)

Just take a minute to contemplate how amazing this is. A picture of an atom.
jtotheizzoe:

You’re looking at the first-ever picture of a hydrogen atom. Or really, it’s an image of the electron orbital “cloudy-woudy, quantumy-wantumy” … stuff. It’s not a real image, like we’re used to seeing, of course. Atoms are smaller than the wavelength of light, and you can’t see anything smaller than the wavelength of light, by definition.
Here’s what you’re looking at: First of all, electrons don’t exist as the cartoonish orbiting particle-planets like we see on the Springfield Isotopes logo:

Instead, they exist as a probability cloud, behaving like both waves and particles. Check out this delightfully old-school MinutePhysics video to see what I mean:

If you know about things like of quantum mechanical principles like the Schrödinger equation, the Pauli Exclusion Principle and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, you know that directly observing an electron, with all of its wavy-particley dualness, is next to impossible. Instead, we describe the identity and “location” of an electron as a probability. In other words, within a certain cloud-like region around a nucleus, an electron has a certain probability of being any which where at any time. Only, if you try to directly observe it, you’re never able to nail down precisely where it is. It’s complicated, I know.
Thanks to newly-developed photoionization microscopy, though, those wave patterns can now be detected! German and Dutch physicists applied laser pulses to hydrogen atoms hanging in an electric field. This excited the hydrogen’s lone electron into various ring-like energy states, and then some of them were flung out to a detector. After observing lots and lots of these, and adding and subtracting all the interfering waves, they were able to reconstruct the probability cloud pattern for every place (and time) that a hydrogen’s electron can be.
If you like that, then you should definitely check out the world’s smallest movie, drawn with individual atoms by IBM. Wave patterns galore!! If you’d like to dig deeper into the physics of this hydrogen atom observation, head over to PhysicsWorld.

Just take a minute to contemplate how amazing this is. A picture of an atom.

jtotheizzoe:

You’re looking at the first-ever picture of a hydrogen atom. Or really, it’s an image of the electron orbital “cloudy-woudy, quantumy-wantumy” … stuff. It’s not a real image, like we’re used to seeing, of course. Atoms are smaller than the wavelength of light, and you can’t see anything smaller than the wavelength of light, by definition.

Here’s what you’re looking at: First of all, electrons don’t exist as the cartoonish orbiting particle-planets like we see on the Springfield Isotopes logo:

Instead, they exist as a probability cloud, behaving like both waves and particles. Check out this delightfully old-school MinutePhysics video to see what I mean:

If you know about things like of quantum mechanical principles like the Schrödinger equation, the Pauli Exclusion Principle and the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, you know that directly observing an electron, with all of its wavy-particley dualness, is next to impossible. Instead, we describe the identity and “location” of an electron as a probability. In other words, within a certain cloud-like region around a nucleus, an electron has a certain probability of being any which where at any time. Only, if you try to directly observe it, you’re never able to nail down precisely where it is. It’s complicated, I know.

Thanks to newly-developed photoionization microscopy, though, those wave patterns can now be detected! German and Dutch physicists applied laser pulses to hydrogen atoms hanging in an electric field. This excited the hydrogen’s lone electron into various ring-like energy states, and then some of them were flung out to a detector. After observing lots and lots of these, and adding and subtracting all the interfering waves, they were able to reconstruct the probability cloud pattern for every place (and time) that a hydrogen’s electron can be.

If you like that, then you should definitely check out the world’s smallest movie, drawn with individual atoms by IBM. Wave patterns galore!! If you’d like to dig deeper into the physics of this hydrogen atom observation, head over to PhysicsWorld.

scinerds:

Buran, Russia’s forgotten Space Shuttle program.

cinecat:

the grave of film pioneer Georges Melies #lavoyagedanslalune #georgesmelies #paris2013 (at Cimetière du Père Lachaise)

cinecat:

the grave of film pioneer Georges Melies #lavoyagedanslalune #georgesmelies #paris2013 (at Cimetière du Père Lachaise)