Does Responsible Consumption Benefit Companies More Than Consumers?


“I only write when I am falling in love, or falling apart.”

http://curiosamathematica.tumblr.com/post/97875542446/exactly-20-years-ago-andrew-wiles-had-the-final


curiosamathematica:

Exactly 20 years ago, Andrew Wiles had the final insight to solve the enigma that had been Fermat’s Last Theorem. He presented his first attempt in 1993 after seven years of secret work, but an error was found. One year later, on September 19, 1994, in what he would call “the most important moment…

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the dark of the ocean, some animals have evolved to use bioluminescence as a defense. In the animation above, an ostracod, one of the tiny crustaceans seen flitting near the top of the tank, has just been swallowed by a cardinal fish. When threatened, the ostracod ejects two chemicals, luciferin and luciferase, which, when combined, emit light. Because the glow would draw undesirable attention to the cardinal fish, it spits out the ostracod and the glowing liquid and flees. Check out the full video clip over at BBC News. Other crustaceans, including several species of shrimp, also spit out bioluminescent fluids defensively. (Image credit: BBC, source video; via @amyleerobinson)

the ocean is sick

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the dark of the ocean, some animals have evolved to use bioluminescence as a defense. In the animation above, an ostracod, one of the tiny crustaceans seen flitting near the top of the tank, has just been swallowed by a cardinal fish. When threatened, the ostracod ejects two chemicals, luciferin and luciferase, which, when combined, emit light. Because the glow would draw undesirable attention to the cardinal fish, it spits out the ostracod and the glowing liquid and flees. Check out the full video clip over at BBC News. Other crustaceans, including several species of shrimp, also spit out bioluminescent fluids defensively. (Image credit: BBC, source video; via @amyleerobinson)

the ocean is sick

(via scienceetfiction)

pulitzercenter:

In 2014, almost a third of Syrian refugee brides in Jordan have been under the age of 18, as reported in New York Times on September 13, 2014. Early marriage often keeps girls from finishing their education, but it’s a price that refugee families are willing to pay to decrease their daughters’ risk of sexual harassment or rape in a region with unenforced law.
Syrian refugees are just one of several groups facing high rates of child marriage. Pulitzer Center grantee Stephanie Sinclair has spent almost a decade investigating the phenomenon, reporting from India, Yemen, Afghanistan, Nepal and Ethiopia.
“In almost every situation, I wanted to take the girl, throw her over my shoulder and get her out of there,” Stephanie wrote. “But I learned it is much more complicated than that.”

pulitzercenter:

In 2014, almost a third of Syrian refugee brides in Jordan have been under the age of 18, as reported in New York Times on September 13, 2014. Early marriage often keeps girls from finishing their education, but it’s a price that refugee families are willing to pay to decrease their daughters’ risk of sexual harassment or rape in a region with unenforced law.

Syrian refugees are just one of several groups facing high rates of child marriage. Pulitzer Center grantee Stephanie Sinclair has spent almost a decade investigating the phenomenon, reporting from India, Yemen, Afghanistan, Nepal and Ethiopia.

“In almost every situation, I wanted to take the girl, throw her over my shoulder and get her out of there,” Stephanie wrote. “But I learned it is much more complicated than that.”

bigblueboo:

3-shaped-shape

bigblueboo:

3-shaped-shape

(via freshphotons)

fastcompany:

The 150-mile stretch of the Mississippi River in Louisiana between Baton Rouge and New Orleans is home to a mindboggling concentration of petrochemical plants, industrial facilities that produce the country’s lifeblood of polypropylene, glycol ethers, perchloroethylene, alcohol ethoxylates, and other unpronounceables. You know, the stuff that eventually becomes our plastic bags, bottles, tires, pesticides, and food preservatives. The corridor is sometimes known as “Cancer Alley,” a bleak nod to the unintended consequences—for people, wildlife, and the landscape—of processing all these chemicals.

Photos:

Holy Rosary Cemetery and Dow Chemical Corporation (Union Carbide Complex), Taft, Louisiana, 1998. © Richard Misrach, courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York; Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco; and Marc Selwyn Gallery, Los Angeles

Petrochemical Landscape, @SCAPE.

thekidshouldseethis:

This Rube Goldberg machine is “powered” by a single beam of light, using mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflective surfaces to burn through strings, melt ice, pop balloons, and more… 
Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

This Rube Goldberg machine is “powered” by a single beam of light, using mirrors, magnifying glasses, and reflective surfaces to burn through strings, melt ice, pop balloons, and more… 

Watch the video.

(via freshphotons)

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 

(Dharamshala, India)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 12, 1992: Dr. Mae Jemison Becomes First African American Woman in Space

On this day in 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to travel through space. She served as Mission Specialist aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-47.

WTCI’s Alison Lebovitz discusses the legacy of the first woman of color to travel beyond the stratosphere on “The A List with Alison Lebovitz.” Watch the interview here.

Photos: NASA

I actually really love this astronaut. She’s went to Standford at age 16, majored in dance (amoungst other things), became a doctor. This woman is literally amazing.

(via pbsthisdayinhistory)