quentintortellini:

History Parallels

1st image: 1967 Newark Riots

2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots

4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

(via bebenod)

letterstomycountry:

postracialcomments:

Ferguson tonight 

LTMC: "Your right to assembly is not being denied."

tabletopwhale:

I made an animated infographic about muscles! You can check out the full version here or get the poster here :)

(via freshphotons)

“My mother told me as I was growing up that being a black man in this society was going to come with great difficulty. At first I wasn’t sure what she meant. I always thought that no matter what we were all treated as equals. I’m sitting here at 18 years old and now I finally understand what it is my mother was trying to say. Growing up in a neighbor that is no stranger to crime, I’ve always been looked down upon by people. I was expected to fail. They predicted my association with drugs, and concluded that my life would be one of utter turmoil and self-destruction. However this simply is not the case. My mother always told me that the color of my skin would bring obstacles throughout my life, and that in order to win the fight against discriminatory injustice, I’d have to show the world my mind and use my voice to make a change. I take those words to heart to this day. Yes I may be a person of color, but that color does not define my character. The color of my skin does not limit the amount of success that I am able to attain, nor does it gives anyone the right to treat me as though I am of little significance. I take pride in knowing that I am a well-spoken, and intellectual man of color. I do not “talk white”. I speak as though I’ve gotten an education. I don’t listen to “black people music”. I am an eclectic individual with a passion for the beautiful artistry within sounds. I am not a wild animal. I am a human being and I expect to be treated as such. As I sit here preparing to leave for college within a few days I cannot help but think about my many peers who have been shot down too young. I cannot help but wonder how many more of us are going to have to be stigmatized and branded as the typical criminal before this society begins to acknowledge not only our flaws but also our successes. I asked myself this question today. If they gunned me down, which photo would they use? Would they choose the image of me giving a public speech to young children about the importance of anti-violence, or would they use the photo of me dressed in an old t-shirt, worn sneakers, and angry look upon my face? Personally I am tired of being swept under the bus. I’m sick of being treated like racism isn’t an issue any longer. And really, I think that it’s about time for all of us to start making a change.”

I am a person of color. And I am proud to be one. (via cosmo-strosity)

(via iftheygunnedmedown)

queenconsuelabananahammock:

wifigirl2080:

dynastylnoire:

ananicola:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

!!!!!!

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST YES DAMMIT!

Damn this is amazing!

BLACK EXCELLENCE

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

thepeoplesrecord:

US begins air strikes in Iraq, Pentagon says
August 8, 2014

American warplanes began bombing Islamic militant targets outside the Kurdish city of Irbil on Friday, in the first offensive action by the US in Iraq since it withdrew ground troops in 2011.

Following authority granted by Barack Obama on Thursday, the Pentagon said two FA-18 jets dropped 500-pound laser-guided bombs on fighters with the Islamic State, also known as Isis or Isil.

The US claimed the militants were using artillery to shell peshmerga forces defending Irbil and threatening US personnel in the city.

“As the president made clear, the United States military will continue to take direct action against Isil when they threaten our personnel and facilities,” said Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby.

Obama’s orders to his military commanders were widely drafted and included permission to take action against Isis forces threatening either the thousands of Yazidi refugees trapped on Mount Sinjar, or the cities of Irbil and Baghdad, where US “military advisers” are based.

The US portrayed its initial action on Friday as a necessary step to protect its joint operation centre in Irbil, which is being used to co-ordinate defences with Peshmerga fighters. “The fact of the matter is we have people in Irbil and if Irbil is allow to fall, they will be at risk,” said national security adviser Ben Rhodes on Friday.

But US jets have been operating over Kurdish areas for some time and the Pentagon believes the Islamic militants advancing toward Irbil pose a significant threat to the city.

Since Obama spoke from the White House on Thursday night, there has been relatively little criticism of his return to Iraqi military interventions in Congress. However there is thought to be deep unease within the White House about the risk of being sucked back into a prolonged campaign against Isis.

Read More

Zero Poverty 2030


Sign the Zero Poverty 2030 campaign (link below). Their goal is to call leaders of every country in the world to support efforts to end extreme poverty by 2030 (extreme poverty is living with less than $1.25 USD a day). Why does signing the petition help?

“In 2007, after more than a million Australians had joined the movement to end extreme poverty, both major parties promised to increase Australia’s foreign budget to 0.5 per cent of gross national income (GNI). Seven years later, Prime Minister Tony Abbott has abandoned these commitments by drastically cutting the aid budget.”

elimudd:

jackie-tylers:

fish-boned:

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

tehfawx:

mr-egbutt:

whimmy-bam:

themaraudingdetective:

grapefruitshampoo:

THIS IS THE MOST AMAZING AND BRILLIANT THING EVER

This is what happens when women write ad campaigns for other women *dies from the hotness*

image

Mildly jealous and slightly aroused? Okay, then we’re all good.

See this is actually really helpful and informative but I need to take a minute because of all these beefcakes.

THE DOCTOR AT THE END THO’?????

IM CRYING

This is my new favorite video.

I may be a lesbian, but damn those abs! LOL.

(Source: youtube.com, via cheesarus)

disciplesofmalcolm:

"Where do we go from here: Chaos or Community?" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1967).
Not very many people seem to know this, as is typical in a country who’s own educational system and mass media keeps it’s own citizens ignorant about their own heroes, that Martin Luther King Jr. was also an author. He wrote several books, this being his last one from 1967.
This book definitely reveals the true Martin Luther King, not the one the power structure tells us about. He touches on many topics, such as history, the hypocritical approach of the U.S. government when it comes to the question of race, the physical and psychological horrors of African life in America, and the unjust, immoral obsession America has with war. These are some among other topics he discusses.
Around the end of his life, King saw the inability and unwillingness of the American government to enforce any of the laws that were meant to help stop racial discrimination of African people in America and others abroad. Ultimately, he took a stand against the war in Vietnam, which turned him into an enemy of the white house, and attempted to start a second march on Washington against the federal government called the Poor People’s Campaign for economic justice (this was neutralized by his assassination). Slowly he came to realize and say with his own words that the dream he had spoken about had turned into a nightmare. During his last few hours alive, he said, as a result of his frustration with the system of racism getting no better, that “we’ve got some difficult days ahead.”
"I’ve come upon something that disturbs me deeply. We have fought hard and long for integration, as I believe we should have, and I know that we will win. But I’ve come to believe we’re integrating into a burning house." (1)
Taken from the back cover:
“We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and defected with a lost opportunity. The ‘tide in the affairs of men’ does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: “Too late.” We still may have a choice today. This may well be mankind’s last chance to choose between chaos and community.”
This is essential reading for anyone who is studying King and his contributions.

disciplesofmalcolm:

"Where do we go from here: Chaos or Community?" by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1967).

Not very many people seem to know this, as is typical in a country who’s own educational system and mass media keeps it’s own citizens ignorant about their own heroes, that Martin Luther King Jr. was also an author. He wrote several books, this being his last one from 1967.

This book definitely reveals the true Martin Luther King, not the one the power structure tells us about. He touches on many topics, such as history, the hypocritical approach of the U.S. government when it comes to the question of race, the physical and psychological horrors of African life in America, and the unjust, immoral obsession America has with war. These are some among other topics he discusses.

Around the end of his life, King saw the inability and unwillingness of the American government to enforce any of the laws that were meant to help stop racial discrimination of African people in America and others abroad. Ultimately, he took a stand against the war in Vietnam, which turned him into an enemy of the white house, and attempted to start a second march on Washington against the federal government called the Poor People’s Campaign for economic justice (this was neutralized by his assassination). Slowly he came to realize and say with his own words that the dream he had spoken about had turned into a nightmare. During his last few hours alive, he said, as a result of his frustration with the system of racism getting no better, that “we’ve got some difficult days ahead.”

"I’ve come upon something that disturbs me deeply. We have fought hard and long for integration, as I believe we should have, and I know that we will win. But I’ve come to believe we’re integrating into a burning house." (1)

Taken from the back cover:

We are now faced with the fact that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked and defected with a lost opportunity. The ‘tide in the affairs of men’ does not remain at the flood; it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is deaf to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words: “Too late.” We still may have a choice today. This may well be mankind’s last chance to choose between chaos and community.

This is essential reading for anyone who is studying King and his contributions.

This One Graph Shows Exactly How Well The Rich Are Winning The Class War (IMAGE)


addictinginfo:

This One Graph Shows Exactly How Well The Rich Are Winning The Class War (IMAGE)

silly poor people

Next time you hear someone say “the rich earned all their money,” call them on it. If your wealth came from economic exploitation, it doesn’t count. And according to these numbers,…

"If your wealth came from economic exploitation, it doesn’t count."

Never thought about it that way.

http://pulitzercenter.tumblr.com/post/91986044948/for-refugees-lack-of-funding-means-delayed


pulitzercenter:

image

For refugees, lack of funding means delayed processing and insufficient aid. For Iraqis, it often means extended periods without any aid at all.

Nada Qasim fled from Baghdad in November with her seven children and husband, targeted by extremists for having worked with American soldiers.